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Rich Moy

Rich Moy
Rich is a Content Marketing Writer at Stack Overflow, where he covers the latest in tech recruiting and developer engagement. When he's not writing, Rich can be found hanging with his wife, watching his favorite college football team with his dad, or running around Manhattan in preparation for his next marathon.
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Recent Posts

Why These HR Leaders Rely on Partnerships With Their Marketing Teams

Post by Rich Moy on Apr 16, 2019 12:00:00 PM

Our recent news roundups for companies hiring developers have featured multiple reports on the growing talent gap. As critical tech roles become more difficult to fill, industry experts agree that a strong employer brand is key to attracting and retaining developers in 2019.

In response, some of the world’s most recognized companies have evolved their employer brand to stay competitive. We’ve also learned that the most successful examples of these “rebranding” campaigns tend to be heavily influenced by in-house marketing teams.

We spoke to HR leaders who lean on their marketing teams to promote their employer brand. Here’s what they had to say.

February News Roundup for Companies Hiring Tech Talent

Post by Rich Moy on Mar 5, 2019 12:00:00 PM

February is a short month but was long on articles about the tech hiring landscape.

New research suggested that companies are struggling to find candidates with the right combination of technical and soft skills. Multiple outlets also reported on the evolving (and complicated) role of artificial intelligence in recruiting.

Updates about emerging technologies, new recruiting tactics, and the best cities for innovation are prominent in this edition of our monthly news roundup. And “a glimpse at the year ahead” posts from thought leaders continued to surface, including an insightful piece from Bill Gates.

January News Roundup for Companies Hiring Tech Talent

Post by Rich Moy on Feb 19, 2019 12:00:00 PM

It may be mid-February but the top news stories from January are still driving the conversation, and they’re all about the growing talent shortage. Multiple reports published last month projected the talent gap to grow exponentially over the next few years, especially as more emerging technologies enter the mainstream. We also saw HR experts respond to these estimates by thinking outside the box to attract and retain developers.

This is the third installment of our monthly roundup of talent acquisition news. January was filled with new research on the tech talent landscape, wage growth for developers, as well as new professional certifications that could drastically impact candidate pools for tough-to-fill jobs.

For These Executives, Employer Branding is Driven by Their Tech Stacks

Post by Rich Moy on Jan 31, 2019 12:00:00 PM

In 2006, our CEO Joel Spolsky wrote that one of the best ways to attract developers is to let them work on something interesting. Based on what we’ve learned over the years, this still rings true for many programmers. In 2018, over 17% of our Developer Survey respondents said that the technologies they’ll work with are their top priority whenever they consider new job opportunities.

We featured batches of our developers’ favorite Company Pages a few months ago, many of which stood because they included specific details about their tech stacks. The feedback we received then was consistent with our survey results, and it led us to speak with engineering execs about how their tech stacks impact their employer brand. Here’s their advice for fellow technology leaders.

November News Roundup for Companies Hiring Tech Talent

Post by Rich Moy on Nov 30, 2018 12:30:00 PM

Invitations to holiday events may have a higher open rate than business emails, but even as things wind down around the office, the pressure to hire top tech talent remains. As the Bureau of Labor Statistics projects employment of software developers to grow 24 percent from 2016 to 2026, tech recruiters can never take too much of a break from looking for talent.

With this post, we’re launching a monthly news round-up comprising some of the most compelling talent acquisition articles relative to tech. In November, industry experts were outspoken about how they’re addressing their current and future tech hiring needs. Since this is our first round-up, we also included a few reports you may have missed earlier this year.

Competing for Talent in Emerging Tech Hubs

Post by Rich Moy on Nov 26, 2018 1:00:00 PM

For years, conventional thinking in the tech industry was that if you wanted to grow an idea into a sustainable business, you needed an office in San Francisco or New York. But that thinking has changed over the last few years. Some of the world's biggest companies are opening offices in emerging tech hubs like Wilmington, DE and Columbus, OH. These cities often offer more affordable real estate and access to untapped pools of talent.

For companies already operating out of these cities, this shift could make it even more difficult to attract and retain developers. We talked to HR leaders based in emerging tech hubs that are preparing to face this challenge. Here's their advice.

10 More Examples of Incredible Company Pages

Post by Rich Moy on Nov 1, 2018 1:30:00 PM

In 2006, Joel Spolsky wrote that the great software developers are never on the open market. This statement rings even truer today—and the potential business impact can’t be overstated. A new Korn Ferry study found that there will be a global talent shortage of more than 85 million people by 2030. The report concludes that left unchecked, the talent shortage could create a loss of $8.5 trillion in unrealized annual revenues.

We recently updated Company Pages on Stack Overflow Talent to better showcase our customers’ employer brands. Updated pages are reviewed by a team of our developers on a rolling basis who are asking themselves: If Stack Overflow wasn’t so great, where would I want to work?

A few weeks ago, we featured our first batch of pages that stood out to them. Here are ten more Company Pages our developers love, organized into sub-categories to highlight what sticks out.

In the Future Will You Know All of Your Coworkers’ Salaries?

Post by Rich Moy on Oct 24, 2018 12:00:00 PM

Last June, Fog Creek Software (now Glitch) generated a lot of attention by revealing company-wide salary information to all of its employees. Anil Dash, the company’s CEO, told Bloomberg that this level of transparency would draw much-needed attention to pay gaps across the country. “Transparency is not a cure-all and it's not the end goal,” he added. “It's a step on the way to the goal, which is to be fair in how we compensate everyone.”

Salary transparency, especially in the tech industry, is one of the year’s most talked about talent-acquisition trends. But how much has changed since Dash first spoke to Bloomberg? And will companies continue to make their employees’ salaries public over the next three to five years?

We reached out to HR executives, and continued the conversation with Dash, to get their take.

Staff Picks: 10 Company Pages We Love

Post by Rich Moy on Oct 9, 2018 12:00:00 PM

Fall is a season of new beginnings. Students are full of optimism about a new school year. People break sweaters out of storage for cooler temperatures and holiday celebrations. And even trees get in on the transformation. At Stack Overflow, we’re celebrating fall with a form of renewal entirely our own: by allowing companies to refresh their employer branding strategy for developers.

After evolving our Talent platform to include things like improved reporting on Job Listings and more responsive Company Pages, we declared September “Back to Branding” month. To celebrate, we encouraged employers to update their Company Pages on Stack Overflow. A team of our developers then reviewed these changes asking: upon reviewing these pages, where would I want to work (if Stack Overflow wasn’t so great)?

Based on our engineers’ feedback, here are ten company pages they love, organized into sub-categories to highlight what stuck out about the companies.

How to Create Fair Salary Ranges for Developer Jobs

Post by Rich Moy on Sep 27, 2018 12:00:00 PM

For many organizations, the process of establishing salary ranges is almost a yearly tradition. Typically, employers consider a variety of factors, such as the importance of each role and the company’s financial standing, to determine pay rates for each job. While average market rates influence this process, it’s difficult for many leaders to find reliable information about developer salaries.

But with the amount of data available today, many employers are taking another look at their compensation strategies. There are a few critical questions that these organizations ask themselves. What are developers earning on the open market? How do our offerings compare to what programmers will find elsewhere? How much room do we have to increase our budget and compete for tech talent?

To answer these questions for your company, here are a few things that fair pay scales for developers have in common.

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