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Ryan Donovan

Ryan Donovan

Recent Posts

The Top 10 Frameworks and What Tech Recruiters Need to Know About Them

As programming matures and application development becomes more complex, developers need more than just an understanding of programming languages. They need to know the frameworks that make creating applications in these languages easier. 

A framework is a set of tools, classes, and functions that serves as the platform on which to build a full application. There’re some tasks that occur in every application: input, display rendering, error handling, for example.  Frameworks handle basics like these so developers can focus on solving the problems related to their specific domain. However, a framework is a broad term, so different frameworks will do different things. 

As a technical recruiter, you should be able to understand what frameworks are and which ones are the most common. If you’re familiar with the term, you probably know them as front-end JavaScript frameworks. As we’ll see, lots of programming languages have frameworks that simplify the development process.

The Ultimate Tech Recruiting Event Checklist

In an era where so much of the recruiting process happens online, in-person recruiting events can seem out of place or old fashioned. But make no mistake: when properly utilized and executed, live events can be an incredibly useful recruiting tool. There’s no real replacement for seeing a candidate face-to-face and interacting with them in real-time, without the pressure and tension of a formal interview, and that’s what recruiting events have to offer. They also give you the chance to show candidates who you are as a company, and why they should consider you specifically.

Why You Should Be Hiring (More) Junior Developers

In any field, experience is one of the main deciding factors used by hiring managers to pick the right candidate. Each field has its own system for how many years a person has to spend working in that field to qualify as “experienced.” In tech, what qualifies as experienced can vary, depending on the candidate in question and the needs of the company. However, one very general guideline of requirements for a candidate to be considered “experienced” is five years of experience as a software developer (including back-end web development), two or more years of professional software development experience (ideally with exposure to the full software lifecycle, from requirements through production), and/or five+ years of development testing experience. For some tech hiring managers, a developer is generally only considered “senior” after ten years of similar experience. 

Understanding quantified achievements on engineering resumes

Resume best practices are always shifting. What sections do you include? Do you put skills on there? Should you include all my jobs, including when you worked as a busboy in high school? This recent question, on StackExchange site the Workplace, highlights a more recent example: “Should I quantify my contributions on my resume?”

What Do You Call People Who Program at your Company?

Every company seems to call their technical employees something different. No, I’m not talking about all the ninjas and gurus out there. I’m talking about the folks who sit in front of an IDE (or, dog forbid, vim) and write lines of code in the desperate hope that it compiles and/or runs. There seems to be no end to the honorifics bestowed upon these folks. 

Words That Set Off Developers’ BS Detectors

Developers are a clever bunch. They’re trained to break a problem into logical chunks so that a computer can perform them the same every time. If you’re looking to hire them, your job listing will undergo the same scrutiny that an algorithm does. They have a pretty refined BS detector, practiced over years of trying to program the impossible and only getting it half right. 

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