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What Do You Call People Who Program at your Company?

Every company seems to call their technical employees something different. No, I’m not talking about all the ninjas and gurus out there. I’m talking about the folks who sit in front of an IDE (or, dog forbid, vim) and write lines of code in the desperate hope that it compiles and/or runs. There seems to be no end to the honorifics bestowed upon these folks. 

Job Listing Keywords: What Developers Search for vs. What Companies Advertise

Supply and demand in the marketplace for tech talent have long since shifted in favour of the candidates. In recruiting circles, it’s referred to as a candidate-driven market. At the same time, the greatest risk for companies is the unmet demand for new talent. This talent gap makes it all the more important to reach those developers who are thinking about a new position. We looked at how the expectations of developers match those of companies by looking at the data from our job board. Specifically, we compared the most common searches by developers with the most common terms used by companies looking to hire. 

Words That Set Off Developers’ BS Detectors

Developers are a clever bunch. They’re trained to break a problem into logical chunks so that a computer can perform them the same every time. If you’re looking to hire them, your job listing will undergo the same scrutiny that an algorithm does. They have a pretty refined BS detector, practiced over years of trying to program the impossible and only getting it half right. 

How to Prioritize Developer Roles in a Startup

Your company just made the jump from idea to reality. You got the funding to hire a core team, but don’t have any founders with serious technical skills. As you prepare to start building your product, you have to answer a fundamental question: how many developers does my startup need, and what roles should I look to fill first?

Understand Developers in Europe with the 2019 Stack Overflow Developer Survey

We now have four European regional reports live, based on data from Stack Overflow’s annual Developer Survey. This survey is the largest and most comprehensive survey of people who code globally, and Europe was the most represented region on our survey this year. Companies in Europe and around the world use findings from this resource to reach, attract, hire, and support developers. This year marks the ninth year we’ve published our annual survey, covering topics including favorite technologies, job preferences, and salary. Thousands of European developers took the 20-minute survey earlier this year.

3 Things Developers Told Us About What Makes a Great Job Listing

At Stack Overflow it’s our mission to match great employers and developers looking for new opportunities. However, our mission doesn’t end with providing smart targeting to show job listings only to the developers with the relevant skill set. We also help companies to better understand their audience and draft job listings that resonate. To be able to do this, we commit to continuous research into which job listings perform best. We go beyond click-through and apply-rates and take the time for qualitative research with candidates you’ll be looking to hire. Here are some of the things developers told us during our last 1:1 interviews in June 2019. 

Why These HR Leaders Rely on Partnerships With Their Marketing Teams

Post by Rich Moy on Apr 16, 2019 12:00:00 PM

Our recent news roundups for companies hiring developers have featured multiple reports on the growing talent gap. As critical tech roles become more difficult to fill, industry experts agree that a strong employer brand is key to attracting and retaining developers in 2019.

In response, some of the world’s most recognized companies have evolved their employer brand to stay competitive. We’ve also learned that the most successful examples of these “rebranding” campaigns tend to be heavily influenced by in-house marketing teams.

We spoke to HR leaders who lean on their marketing teams to promote their employer brand. Here’s what they had to say.

December News Roundup for Companies Hiring Tech Talent

The New Year often signals a hiring push. It also means a flood of candidates ready to make a change that extends beyond more time in the gym (read: New Year, new job.) But as our research has shown, developers don’t always follow typical patterns and they are among the most competitive talent pools.

This is our second monthly news round-ups where we highlight prominent talent acquisition news in the tech world. December was a month filled with talks on how A.I. will impact hiring in the future, the importance of diversity in the workplace, and a continued focus on blockchain and cryptocurrency.

5 Important Takeaways From the 2018 North American Developer Landscape

Post by Rich Moy on May 29, 2018 12:00:00 PM

Today, we launched the 2018 North American Developer Landscape. This report covers everything you need to know about programmers located in the United States and Canada, such as basic demographics, educational background, and their favorite technologies.

This year, over 100,000 respondents participated in the global version of this report—and over 24,000 of those people live in either the United States or Canada.

Let’s take a closer look at five of the most important takeaways from this year’s North American report. In this post, we’ll also discuss how these stats can help you optimize your entire tech recruiting strategy.

Which Industries Are Software Developers Working In?

Post by Rich Moy on Mar 19, 2018 12:00:00 PM

All the world's developers work for tech companies, right? Not exactly.

In this year’s edition of the Global Developer Hiring Landscape, we found that today’s developers work in a diverse range of industries. But what else does this mean for employers like you? How appealing are companies inside and outside the technology industry to developers? Let’s take a closer look at the results

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