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Why Your Tech Job Listings Aren't Attracting the Right Candidates

Post by Rich Moy on Sep 29, 2016 12:00:00 PM

How exciting is it to see that your inbox is suddenly overflowing with applicants to an urgent technical opening? I still have vivid memories of diving into large piles of applications with high expectations, only to find that nobody was qualified for the job. As challenging as it is to write tech job listings that make developers want to work for you, it’s even more important to write copy that grabs the attention of the right candidates. To help you identify ways to make the right edits, here are a few common reasons that the developers you’re looking for aren’t responding to your job listings.

3 Ways to Measure the Success of Your Tech Job Listings

Post by Rich Moy on Sep 15, 2016 12:00:00 PM

When your tech job listings for urgent developer openings don’t generate the volume of applications you initially hoped they would, it’s easy to assume that everything is broken and that it’s time to start over. And sure, the number of people in your candidate pool is often a good indicator of how well your job listings are resonating with developers. However, application volume isn’t the only metric you should look at to understand the effectiveness of your job listings. Here are a few additional metrics to gauge the impact of your tech job listings.

3 Tips to Make More Impactful Edits to Your Tech Job Listings

Post by Rich Moy on Sep 8, 2016 12:00:00 PM

I can understand how difficult it is to find the motivation to optimize your tech job listings if you haven’t always seen a high volume of candidates viewing them. “There’s no point,” you might say. “If nobody’s reading my job listings, why would I invest even more time editing them?” If you’re anything like I was when I was a recruiter, you might also think that optimizing your job listings means staring blankly at the document until inspiration finally strikes and the edits you need to make become blatantly obvious. However, before you take pen to paper, here are a few things to keep in mind when you’re trying to make meaningful revisions to your tech job listings.

Who Should Be Writing Your Company's Tech Job Listings?

It’s been a long-standing debate on who should be responsible for writing a tech job listing. Technical job listings and descriptions are very different than those for a sales or marketing position, and they should be catered toward what the candidate is looking for. At the same time, you want to make sure the listing includes the basic, non-technical requirements as well. This means you’ll need more than one person contributing to writing your tech job listings.

Depending on the size and nature of your team, the answer to this post’s title question can vary. Your best bet is to use a combination of the following to write your tech job listings.

How Lackluster Tech Job Listings Can Lead to Bad Hires

Post by Rich Moy on Aug 24, 2016 12:00:00 PM

How many times has a hiring manager come to you with a job that was so urgent, you could only cobble together a job listing that you hoped would grab the attention of developers? If your experiences have been anything like mine, I have a feeling that you’ve launched plenty of searches for developer candidates with job listings that you weren’t exactly thrilled about. Whenever I rushed into a new search, I assumed that I could get away with subpar listings if I did a good enough job selling the company to top candidates during the interview process. Still, there are plenty of opportunities for a poorly-written tech job listing to impact your entire search. Here are a few ways lackluster tech job listings might lead to a costly bad hire.

3 Ways Tech Job Listings Impact Your Entire Developer Sourcing Strategy

Post by Rich Moy on Aug 18, 2016 12:00:00 PM

It’s no secret that your tech job listings are often the first opportunity you have to make a positive first impression on developers. They inform active and passive developer candidates alike about what makes your company stand out from the competition, especially in the beginning stages of their job search. While they’re undeniably important for your initial outreach to a developer is evident, here are a few ways that your tech job listings also have a tremendous impact on every stage of your sourcing strategy.

3 Signs That It's Time to Rewrite Your Tech Job Listings

Post by Rich Moy on Aug 8, 2016 12:00:00 PM

Well-written tech job listings are integral components of your entire developer hiring strategy. They often present your first opportunity to make a good impression on developers, and if they tell a compelling enough picture of the positions you need to fill, your company will stand out from the competition. However, there are some telltale signs that your roles are getting lost in the shuffle. Here are a few things that should tell you it’s time to take an editor’s pen to your existing tech job listings.

3 Things Developers Want to See More Often in Tech Job Listings

Post by Rich Moy on Jun 30, 2016 12:00:00 PM

I’m willing to bet that a lot of the advice you’ve read about writing compelling tech job listings came at the exact moment(s) you thought, “Wow, I’m pretty great at this.” The timing of these discoveries can be frustrating, but it’s no secret that developers have strong opinions about the things they see in tech job postings. And if you want to make a great first impression, it’s important to understand what does (and doesn’t) resonate with developers when they read job listings. To shed some light on this mystery, we interviewed a handful of developers to hear their thoughts about what they wish employers included more often when they write a technical job listing.

3 Surprising Mistakes Commonly Found in Tech Job Listings

Post by Rich Moy on Jun 22, 2016 12:00:00 PM

Even the most experienced writers can be intimidated by a blank page. And hey, sometimes that’s not a bad thing. When you’re trying to create a tech job listing, it’s natural to put a lot of pressure on yourself to say exactly the right things that will make developers want to apply. However, employers often take an aggressive approach to writing job listings that stand out amongst the competition—and the results are not always pretty. To help you avoid some surprisingly common mistakes, here are a few things that might seem like good ideas for your tech job listings, but are actually driving candidates away.

3 Reasons Why You Shouldn't Reuse Old Tech Job Listings

Post by Rich Moy on Jun 16, 2016 12:00:00 PM

I’m willing to bet that you spent a lot of time writing (and rewriting) your tech job listings. It’s no secret that it takes a good amount of effort to create compelling job descriptions that resonate with developers. When you write a draft that you’re happy with, it’s understandable to assume that you’ll be able to reuse what you’ve written anytime you need to hire a developer in the future. However, even on the most consistent technical teams, every job you’re hiring for is unique. Although you won’t always need to start from scratch, here are a few reasons why you shouldn’t just copy and paste a job listing every time you need to hire developers.

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